In the News: November Edition

The Arctic Bumble Bee Bumble bees are the only species of bees that live that far up north, and these fuzzy pollinators play an important role in the pollination of plants in the Arctic. Though their role is important, little is actually known of them. With the changing climate and melting of glaciers, it is as important as ever to find out more about these fuzzy friends. To bring to light more information, 6 scientists have gathered to search 1000 miles, for one goal, the arctic bumble bee. Contaminated Honey After analyzing 198 samples from every continent, except Antarctica, it was found that at least one in five pesticides that the honey was tested for was found in a majority of the samples. Those continents with the highest contamination were Asia, North America, and Europe. For more, check out the published results in the journal Science. Buzzless Bees What would a bee with it’s buzz? Research shows we might find out.  Scientists have found that pesticides may interfere with the type of vibrations used by bees to collect pollen. The interference reduces the amount of buzz put off by the bees, lowering the amount of pollen collected. In fact the study’s results showed that bees exposed to pesticides collected around 50% less pollen than those who were not exposed. This drastic decrease would impact the bee’s productivity and their capabilities of pollinating crops and farmlands. The Secret Killer While we’ve been blaming pesticides for the devastating decline of the bees, fungicides have slide by, blame-free... Until now. Instead, they found a shocker: fungicides commonly thought to have no impact. New research shows how fungicides - particularly chlorothalonil, may actually negatively affect bee health. .It is time to start taking a deeper look at all the chemicals we use in our garden.