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Hive Journal

The Pollinator's City Guide to New York City

Welcome to Beekeeper's Naturals Pollinator-Friendly City Guides: your passport to traveling the world's best cities with VIPs (that's Very Important Pollinators) in mind. 

Start spreading the news: New York City's not just a concrete jungle; it's a great place to catch up with the honeybees. Scope out the city's parks and enjoy the best farm-to-table food while you get to know the city-slicking bees that find nature even in one of the busiest, bustling cities in the world. 

Eat

  • Friend of a Farmer (77 Irving Place): Seasonally-fresh fair is all you'll find at Friend of a Farmer. Stop by for brunch or dinner and enjoy fresh-squeezed juice with your meal. 
  • Thai Farm Kitchen (416 Church Ave): Organic produce and ingredients from Thailand come together in every dish served at Thai Farm Kitchen. Vegans will love the plant-based menu, which includes mouth-watering entrees for $11 or less. 
  • Bellwether NYC (47-25 Vernon Boulevard): Head to Long Island City for sustainably sourced ingredients and a more elegant vibe. You'll need reservations to land a table at this spot. 
  • Mudspot (307 East 9th Street): There's a secret garden in the back of this East Village restaurant that will make you feel right at home with the bees. Bring a book and enjoy a NY breakfast (a bagel and cream cheese, duh) along with a cup of coffee for just $5. 
  • maman (multiple locations): This French-inspired menu features some of the most gorgeous salads you can find in the city. 
  • Malibu Farm (89 South Street): Situated in Manhattan's Seaport District, Malibu Farm serves up delicious seafood and veggie feasts, as well as brioche coconut french toast for weekend brunch.

Explore

  • Central ParkMany New Yorkers will tell you that Central Park is the city's greatest natural treasure—although Prospect Park in Brooklyn is lovely in its own right. Stroll the park, and you'll come across vibrant flowers, honeybees, and plenty of people-watching. 
  • New York Botanical GardensTake the Metro-North Harlem line straight to the New York Botanical Gardens. Make sure to check out the Bronx Greenup: a community gardening outreach program started in 1988. 
  • Union Square GreenmarketShop the stands of local farmers and find fresh veggies, homemade cheeses, spreads, and more.
  • Little Island: This 2.4-acre public park on the Hudson River is NYC's newest (and buzziest) spot for food, drinks, and performances.